Tag Archives: Doctor Who

Funko Pop Who

CNET posted a Tech Culture article on new Doctor Who themed Pop character figures coming soon. The whole range of Pop cuties looks great – with figures for Rose, River Song, Captain Jack Harkness, Sarah Jane Smith, The Silence and the Ninth Doctor.

The steal of the collection, for me, has to be the K-9, which according to the C-NET blurb will be an exclusive (in the US at least) for GameStop. I hope that someone will have these available outside the US – whether international GameStops or otherwise – because I have money in hand right now to get one of these!

pop-300-K9-Doctor-Who

Thumbs up to Bonnie Girl for posting this article and pictures.

Quick Doctor Who Characters

IMG_20151011_160018-2I’m running one or more convention games of Doctor Who (from Cubicle 7) over the next few months, starting with this coming weekend.

This past weekend, I finished creating a set of “pre-generated” character cards for the game.

Essentially, they’re not complete characters by any measure – just enough to get through a session. While I could easily have done six or seven fixed character sheets, I have been pleased with card-based characters when running The Dee Sanction and Night’s Black Laundry. My thinking, why not!

I plan to lay the cards down on the table and players get to choose one (or more) from each row as the game progresses. In practice, when someone pushes a challenge, then would be a good time to choose a card.

Alternatively, they could take one from each row at the start of the session. Or I could hand them out at random. That’s the approach with the other games I’ve used character cards. Indeed, my last game of The Dee Sanction generated some fantastic characters right off the bat based on the cards alone.

I think these cards might warrant some tweaking to achieve something like that. I’d quite like to add a random naming suggestion and maybe a motivation or two.

In use, characters will possess any Skills not listed, but they’d have a value of 1. Or zero. I don’t want to go down that route. I’d rather people stick with what they’re good at. Otherwise, players can make rolls based on Attribute alone if no one has the right Skill at the given location or a specific scene.

I tweaked the character generation process of my Call of Cthulhu game on the same basis around skills. I dislike the standard method that creates characters with tiny percentile chances of success on skills.

All characters start with 12 Story Points. Because I’ve created the cards without the full spread of abilities, I don’t want to penalise them further! While I have given everyone a gadget worth a Story Point, it still doesn’t quite compensate.

The three cards align in a column. I noticed that you could actually boil the standard character sheet down into a half an A4 column – so, why not do it with cards.

sample-vortex

The top row of cards has each of the six classes from the Time Lord Academy, plus a Gallifreyan who opted to ‘go wild’. The Shobogan made their appearance in Classic episode The Deadly Assassin. I wanted a non-Time Lord as an option, but with the potential to be involved and of value. Herein, the Shobogan fills the base roll of a more physical Gallifreyan.

The middle row has aspects of personality, which serve up good and bad Traits.

The bottom row fits a sort of career path, offering an extra Attribute point and key Skills. Also, extra Traits and a Gadget.

My adventure concerns students escaping Gallifrey at the start of the Time War, which (from a plot perspective) excuses the shortfall in points here and there. They are, however, the best and brightest the Academy has to offer.

Link to card sheets:
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B2zIvdT-XhJieFlRMkQtZks0NXc&usp=sharing

Wing It for Adventure

winter_for_the_adept_wallpaper_by_hisi79-d5zdo7xI ran the third and final session of the adventure Ice from the Eighth Doctor Sourcebook at the weekend. I think I could have finished this in two four-hour sessions, but we had more of a social thing going on and the focus wasn’t quite there. At a pinch, I think you could throttle this up to run in a single session or at a convention, but you would need to keep all the action tight.

On top of that, you would need to be really sharp in hitting the beats associated with building the threat. The ultimate secret of the icebound alien colony doesn’t work so well unless you have done ground work on the back story. I think, despite having three sessions to run it over, I failed to do enough of that very ground work. Ah well – lessons learned.

Overall, I enjoyed running the adventure – though I found myself increasingly improvising and casting the system to one side. I have to say that has everything to do with me and nothing to do with the Vortex system. When I want to get a game to a conclusion, the system goes out the window. Yes, the players still roll dice – because many of them enjoy that part of the process – but the nitty-gritty mechanics don’t trouble me.

I liked the way the characters starting to do their own improvisation around the situation. When they realised that they didn’t have an easy escape route, they used some fast talking and deception to find an alternative. The adventure has a traditional aspect of putting the TARDIS off-limits early on, so Tegan and Nyssa found a way to get it back – and then I threw the big threat in their way. Panic ensued, followed by the sonorous tones of the Cloister Bell. Yes, you have the TARDIS back; no, it won’t budge because the time rotor is making all the wrong sounds.

I enjoyed running the game and all the players go involved for the final session (after some patchy player participation in earlier sessions). The final showdown had just the right level of cricket involved (it was the Fifth Doctor!) and a final-final scene with a touch of Flash Gordon about it. Did the villian die or did he simply slip away to return another day?

Bigger Hair

There’s one thing I like about the second series of each new Doctor – and that’s the business of making the character their own. Somehow, the first appearance isn’t enough.

From the scant pictures we’ve had of Peter Capaldi so far, it seems like he has more of a personalised image. I especially like what I’ve seen of his hair. It seems to be growing, bigger and wilder. That works for me. The mop of hair thing worked big time for Tom Baker – but that isn’t exactly what we’re doing here. This is all Capaldi’s own thing.

I also like the continued sense of channelling Pertwee’s red-lined jacket. I really like that. Maybe there’s a touch of the Third Doctor in the hair. Maybe.

p02ydhkx

Kit for Adventure

So, I ran the second session of the adventure Ice from the Eighth Doctor Sourcebook.

Running Doctor Who

The key to the game seemed to be having the right equipment at the table to facilitate the fun. I’m familiar with the rules – so, there’s no need to have my Limited Edition War Doctor-sporting rulebook on display. The core book sits on the floor or a chair nearby normally, as I only really need it if the players ask me a tough question and they really want an answer (rather than enthusiastic hand-waving).

Instead of the rule book, I use the Gamemaster’s Screen [A] (which would appear to be out of print, so if you want one you’ll need to try the secondary market). I find this screen a lot more useful than many other examples of the same (you know who you are D&D 5e), as it includes a plethora of immediately useful tables and information.

For the adventure, I just have the whole text available as a PDF on my 7 inch Tablet [B], although I also have occasion to do the same with a smartphone or laptop. Depends on the table space available. I keep notes in a TXT file or similar and any additional images or information in a folder on the desktop.

If I want to make real world notes, draw notes, scribble maps or present clues/riddles, I use my hand Dry Wipe pens [C] on my equally handy Super-sized Dry Wipe Cards [D]. Why use up all that paper and sticky notes of old, or roll an enormous battle mat across the table? If I’d had a battle mat it wouldn’t have fitted it on this table without getting in the way.

I keep notes on the cards and, as here, create a reference map of locations the characters have been or can visit [E]. Later in the game, I also drew a picto-glyph clue for them to refer to.

IMG_20150627_191447

Yeah – not overly subtle. However, it did have them wondering just what the alien’s had going relationship-wise. All at each other’s throats or not?

I have recently got hold of some Clear Plastic Stands [F] that work with my dry wipe cards. Took a bit of trial and error to finds ones that fitted – some clearly had some sort of thin card in mind and wouldn’t take a plastic card at all. Others would take half of one or the card simply slipped out and fell over.

In this instance I used the cards in stands for a map; in others I have used them for game aspects, key information or even quick character sketches. I experimented with create a dungeon – though I suspect I would have to be really keen to get all the work done for that.

I use a combination of standard dry wipe pens and Staedtler Correctable [C] – which you can rub accidentally with a finger or hand without loss. To remove, you use either a slightly abrasive tissue or cloth or they include a felt eraser on the other end. Combining both pens means you can have elements easily removed – like the difficulty to access a location in this adventure – and more permanent elements – like the location name – that need to stick around as long as you have a need.

My othered preferred point of reference in a game with locations (or a map) are miniatures for each playing; mind you, I’m not looking for tactical placement or accuracy. Here I use the Doctor Who figures from Character Building [G] with only a light regard for accuracy. I have the Fifth Doctor right, but for Nyssa I used Amy and Tegan got River. They’re both female – I got that bit right!

I have mentioned before the benefits of a stab of sound here and there – and for that I need my HMDX Jam Bluetooth Speaker [H]. I used it with both my phone and tablet – using the little cable that comes with it. Bluetooth is great, but in this situation it makes sense just to use the cable and conserve power! After the summary of Part 1, we had the theme tune. Later, I had some spooky atmospheric music as the team explored. Then, upon outlining the worrisome cliffhanger, a rousing turn of the closing theme followed. Perfect to frame a proper session of Doctor Who.

Finally, a nice Cup of Tea [T]. The Doctor would approve.