Jun, 2015

Kit for Adventure

So, I ran the second session of the adventure Ice from the Eighth Doctor Sourcebook.

Running Doctor Who

The key to the game seemed to be having the right equipment at the table to facilitate the fun. I’m familiar with the rules – so, there’s no need to have my Limited Edition War Doctor-sporting rulebook on display. The core book sits on the floor or a chair nearby normally, as I only really need it if the players ask me a tough question and they really want an answer (rather than enthusiastic hand-waving).

Instead of the rule book, I use the Gamemaster’s Screen [A] (which would appear to be out of print, so if you want one you’ll need to try the secondary market). I find this screen a lot more useful than many other examples of the same (you know who you are D&D 5e), as it includes a plethora of immediately useful tables and information.

For the adventure, I just have the whole text available as a PDF on my 7 inch Tablet [B], although I also have occasion to do the same with a smartphone or laptop. Depends on the table space available. I keep notes in a TXT file or similar and any additional images or information in a folder on the desktop.

If I want to make real world notes, draw notes, scribble maps or present clues/riddles, I use my hand Dry Wipe pens [C] on my equally handy Super-sized Dry Wipe Cards [D]. Why use up all that paper and sticky notes of old, or roll an enormous battle mat across the table? If I’d had a battle mat it wouldn’t have fitted it on this table without getting in the way.

I keep notes on the cards and, as here, create a reference map of locations the characters have been or can visit [E]. Later in the game, I also drew a picto-glyph clue for them to refer to.

IMG_20150627_191447

Yeah – not overly subtle. However, it did have them wondering just what the alien’s had going relationship-wise. All at each other’s throats or not?

I have recently got hold of some Clear Plastic Stands [F] that work with my dry wipe cards. Took a bit of trial and error to finds ones that fitted – some clearly had some sort of thin card in mind and wouldn’t take a plastic card at all. Others would take half of one or the card simply slipped out and fell over.

In this instance I used the cards in stands for a map; in others I have used them for game aspects, key information or even quick character sketches. I experimented with create a dungeon – though I suspect I would have to be really keen to get all the work done for that.

I use a combination of standard dry wipe pens and Staedtler Correctable [C] – which you can rub accidentally with a finger or hand without loss. To remove, you use either a slightly abrasive tissue or cloth or they include a felt eraser on the other end. Combining both pens means you can have elements easily removed – like the difficulty to access a location in this adventure – and more permanent elements – like the location name – that need to stick around as long as you have a need.

My othered preferred point of reference in a game with locations (or a map) are miniatures for each playing; mind you, I’m not looking for tactical placement or accuracy. Here I use the Doctor Who figures from Character Building [G] with only a light regard for accuracy. I have the Fifth Doctor right, but for Nyssa I used Amy and Tegan got River. They’re both female – I got that bit right!

I have mentioned before the benefits of a stab of sound here and there – and for that I need my HMDX Jam Bluetooth Speaker [H]. I used it with both my phone and tablet – using the little cable that comes with it. Bluetooth is great, but in this situation it makes sense just to use the cable and conserve power! After the summary of Part 1, we had the theme tune. Later, I had some spooky atmospheric music as the team explored. Then, upon outlining the worrisome cliffhanger, a rousing turn of the closing theme followed. Perfect to frame a proper session of Doctor Who.

Finally, a nice Cup of Tea [T]. The Doctor would approve.

Call to Adventure

winter_for_the_adept_wallpaper_by_hisi79-d5zdo7xI recently played the first session of the Ice adventure from the Eighth Doctor Sourcebook.

I’m not running this as a campaign, per the intentions of the supplement, but as a standalone. I felt that the adventure would work quite nicely that way.

I also used the Fifth Doctor and Nyssa as the characters at the centre of the adventure. The adventure slots into the continuity between Time-Flight and Arc of Infinity in the series (between Season 19 and 20), where several New Adventure novels and Big Finish audio dramas probably all dwell.

As it happens, this choice came down to the players. One loved the Nyssa character and wanted to play her, so it seemed to be just right. Ice involves rooting around in caves beneath a frozen planet and somehow that seemed perfectly Fifth Doctor as well.

All this isn’t really the point of this post. What I wanted to mention was the fact that I punctuated the session with music.

At the start of the adventure the TARDIS arrivals unexpectedly on a cold planet. Unexpectedly arrivals are not unusual in Who. In this case, the cold is the unusual part. The TARDIS feels cold. So, the Doctor’s curiosity gets the better of him, as how could a planet penetrate the TARDIS like that?

After finding suitable clothes in the Wardrobe, the two character ventured out and I described the desolate, glacial scenery. And the cold. They trudged a bit and casting around they realised that something lay beneath the ice, some relic of an alien city.

At that point, a snowmobile appeared in the distance. Nyssa hid while The Doctor bid a cheery hello to the newcomer. While conversation ensued, Nyssa became aware of an odd vibration in the ice. Or was it more of a tremor?

A moment later, mid-conversation, the guy on the snowmobile wheeled it around as the ice creaked, shuddered and then cracked. Sheets of grey-blue ice jabbed skyward while others dropped into the abyss. Both characters made a leap for safety, The Doctor fell, only for his fingers to catch an edge.

As The Doctor struggled to get up, aided by the stranger, Nyssa looked across the ice field. Jagged streaks patterned the surface, now covered with pits and holes. In the distance the TARDIS…

And then it dropped out of sight.

Queue the stab of the Who theme. POW.

If they hadn’t got in the mood up to that point, the theme made all the difference. We’re all suddenly bobbing about and squeal wee-woo.

It set the mood and also served as a way to cut to the next scene, as the snowmobile ground into the waiting camp beyond the mountains. No need to worry about the journey between or the uneasy silence from the stranger. The Doctor and Nyssa could worry about the TARDIS later – they had new people to meet and a mysterious city to uncover.

The theme worked really well. I can’t say that music works for everyone, and as a background noise it will be Marmite for some groups. But in that moment, the stab of the Theme worked wonderfully well, just as the outro version of the theme worked well at the end of the session, just as I revealed the cliffhanger revelation.

I recommend giving it a try, whatever the game. If you can find a theme tune, go for it. I can see it providing a valuable and rather entertaining framing motif. If you follow the TV serial approach to games, it doesn’t always have to happen at the same time. Some shows you can go five, ten, even fifteen minutes before they kick in the theme tune and the opening credits. In a longer drama or serial, they have a degree of leeway – as do you in running a gaming session.

Find a tune. Set the tone of the session. Hit the danger or reveal the cliffhanger from last session – and then play the theme.

Original art (cropped for this post) by deviantart contributor hisi79